Monthly Archives: October 2015

4 Ways to Get The Most Out Of Your Dance Class Experience: Maximize Growth as a dancer & Your dollars

Let’s face it, if you’re paying for a dance class, it’s an investment that can sometimes get pretty pricey; and for many of us, no matter what it is, if we put our hard earned cash into it… we want it to be worth it! Yes you expect your instructor to be knowledgeable and encouraging but as an adult dance student, who’s footing the bill for every class, (no matter the level of dance) it is also your responsibility to make an effort as well to make sure you get the most from your time there.  Here are 4  guaranteed ways to make sure you get the most of your class experience.

  1. Arrive on time – As a student when you’re late to class,  not only are you losing some of your hard earned cash on time you can no longer get back,  but also missing out on one of the the most important parts of class,  THE WARM UP. We all have been guilty of arriving late, doing some flimsy leg swing and a couple of toe touches before jumping into a serious class combination qqwithout warming up. Sadly if you make this a habit it could lead to unwanted  injuries and of course the dreaded , inability to take class altogether. Arriving early or on time , is less stressful,  helps avoid some injuries, allows for time to handle any personal rituals to get you relaxed, focused and ready to get the most out of your class.

 

 

2. Don’t stand in the backback If you’re on time and if there’s space in the front, attempt to grab yourself a spot as close to the front as possible. I know some classes are just full no matter when you arrive and in that case, I suggest just to position yourself where you can see the instructor. If there’s a time where the rows switch from front to back, TAKE ADVANTAGE and DO NOT STAY IN THE BACK.  Why pay to not be able to see anything but another students rendition of what the instructor is doing. Getting the most from your class depends a lot on being able to see, hear, and apply. If two of those things are missing  because you try to dance secretly in the back, you are cheating yourself from not only a great time but an opportune moment to confidently buss your Beyoncé Wine, lol.

 

3. Ask questions – As they say, “A closed mouth, doesn’t get fed.” to get the most from your class I whole heartily believe depends on you leaving there with knowledge of what you learned that day. Your instructor is there to help and educate you, in fact I would be wary of any instructor that doesn’t enjoy someone asking a question.  There’s nothing worse than your instructor asking “if  anyone has questions” only to be greeted by blank stares of uncertainty. Don’t be afraid! It’s your right as a paying student to ask questions and to leave every class feeling not only exhausted but also accomplished. It’s your gain to always speak up and ask so that you get that much closer to mastering what is being taught.

4. Dance full out– Why spend your most valuable time “half stepping”? You’ve made it on time, clYou’ve got an ideal spot in the front and asked very helpful questions and when the music drops you’ve dedicated 20% to the choreography given to you. Take advantage of the comradery and energy of your classmates along with the  encouragement and guidance from your instructor and leave it all on the floor. Your growth as a dancer thrives on that moment to apply what you have learned. Don’t worry about who is looking just enjoy yourself and the experience.

Remember you have taken the  time to invest in yourself which is a priceless value. Be encouraged and fearless to  get the most out of your classroom investment no matter where you are in the dance world. You deserve it and owe it to yourself for ANY class you take.

The beautiful thing about learning is that no one can take it away from you. – B.B. King

 To put it all to the test join us in Raediant Movement’s Weekly Class or Sign Up for our email list to be notified when we are coming to your town!

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